The uncomfortable waiting

The uncomfortabe waiting ~ Crystal Gornto | HeartStories

Picking my sister up at the airport late Tuesday night reminded me of something I’ve been thinking about recently when flying.

The stressful waiting before exiting the plane.

You know, as soon as that seatbelt sign goes off, everyone is rushing to grab their stuff and be the first person to stand up in the aisle?  Hurry, hurry, hurry up . . . to wait.  Well, I don’t play that game.  I sit in my seat and read quietly until the exiting action reaches a row or two in front of me.  Then I close my book, grab my bag, and eventually stand up.

It stresses people out.  

I’ve noticed that if I’m in a middle or isle seat, the person next to me gets all stressed out.  They’ll usually stand up, breathe a little heavy, and lean over me, doing everything they can to signal that I should get up.  All of course, without saying a word.

There’s no rule you have to stand up to wait.  I’m usually ready to pop right up and be on my way when it’s my turn.  But I certainly notice the tension and it makes me chuckle inside a little bit.

I laugh because I get it.

I’m a go-girl.  I don’t like to sit still and wait when there are things that need to be done.  It’s been especially true sitting with Dad in the hospital these past few days, waiting to find out what’s going on.  Waiting for him to get well.

I’m not comfortable in the waiting.

So I fill the waiting with action.  I ask a few more questions.  I research all the possibilities on google.   I reach out to a few more doctor-friends for advice.

But I’ve noticed that the gift is in the waiting.  

The quiet moments of just being with him.   Tucking in his blanket.  Talking about life.  Holding his hand.  Whispering prayers of trust.

Waiting.

Yes, it’s awkward.  It’s uncomfortable.  It can be super stressful, especially when the outcome is so unknown.

But what I’ll remember most are these moments of waiting.  Trusting.  Hoping.  Believing.  With my friends and family.

Together.  

The waiting is likely what you’ll remember too.  

You might not be in a hospital room or an airplane today, but I bet you’re waiting.  Waiting on something or someone.  And I want to encourage you to pay attention to the gifts in the waiting.  When you look back you’ll realize a lot of life happened in the waiting.

Don’t try to fill it.  Don’t try to rush it.  Don’t try to avoid it.

Just sit with it.  Trust.  Hope.  Believe.  

This is the good stuff.

to more love,

Crystal

P. S. Thank you for all your thoughts and prayers regarding my sweet daddy.  It means more than you know.  We think we’ve ruled out it being his heart and we are still waiting . . .

Leave a Reply